Curaçao Map
Site Index
Contact
Random
Our Travel Books
Advertising / Press

The Blue Room

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

An almost entirely submerged cave found in the cliffs of the western coast, the Blue Room is one of the island’s most famous snorkeling spots, second perhaps only to the Tugboat. We visited it during our last week on Curaçao, and found it to be just as beautiful as advertised.

The Blue Room is exactly what you think it’s going to be: a cave totally bathed in a deep, blue light. There’s always room between the water’s surface and the ceiling of the cave, so you can swim into it without worries. If you go all the way to the end of the room and look back toward the entrance, the effect is stunning, especially on a sunny afternoon when the light illuminates everything to perfection.

It’s possible to hire a boat to take you to the Blue Room, but it’s just as easy to walk over along the path which starts at the Santa Cruz Beach, and this is what we did. The biggest advantage of the boat is that you’ll have someone to watch your stuff. The Blue Room is notorious for thieves, who lurk in the woods and wait for their victims to leave their belongings unattended.

Let me repeat that: the Blue Room is notorious for thieves. We’re friends with a couple who visited the Blue Room about a week before us. They knew about the danger of theft, so made sure to hide their stuff carefully before entering the water. But they were being watched, and when they came out of the water, everything was gone: wallets, clothes, car keys, shoes. It is not enough to hide your possessions, you absolutely have to leave someone as a guard. For that reason, it’s most fun to do the Blue Room if you’re in a group of at least three.

Even considering this, we cannot bring ourselves to recommend the boat trip to the Blue Room offered by “Captain Goodlife,” who operates from Santa Cruz. During our short interaction with him, he was unbelievably rude — as soon as he realized we just wanted information and weren’t planning to hire him, his friendly demeanor vanished and he refused to offer us any advice. Our unlucky friends reported a similar experience. He owns the nearest shop, and so was the first person they went to after having their things stolen. He scoffed at their situation, and said something to the effect of “serves you right” [for walking along the path, instead of booking a tour with him].

Wait a second… how did this article about an amazing natural phenomenon get hijacked by thieves and rude business owners?! Let’s get back to the good stuff. We loved the Blue Room. It’s not extra-large, and you can see the whole thing in just a few minutes, but we were so entranced by the gorgeous colors, we stayed until our skin started to wrinkle.

Getting into the water is easy enough, as you can jump from the rocks, but exiting is a little more problematic. You really have to pull yourself up onto the rocks, so you have to be in decent condition. It’s not overly hard, but just be aware that there isn’t a ladder or anything to help you leave the water.

If you enjoy snorkeling and are on Curaçao for any length of time, you owe it to yourself to check out the Blue Room. The walk to the cave takes about twenty minutes from Santa Cruz, and with proper precautions, it can be enjoyed without worry.

Location our Map
The Path to the Blue Room on Wikiloc

This Is Our Underwater Camera

, , , , , ,
February 27, 2016 at 9:44 pm Comments (5)

A Trip to Klein Curaçao

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Klein Curaçao, a small, uninhabited island found a few miles southeast of Curaçao, has become a popular destination for day trips, thanks to its pristine beach, excellent snorkeling, and atmosphere of forsaken solitude. We booked an excursion which brought us to the island on a catamaran, and spent the day checking it out.

Klein Curacao

There are a number of operators which offer trips to Klein Curaçao, but we decided to book with Bounty Adventures, on the recommendation of a friend. And it turns out that the word “Adventure” in the company’s name is no joke.

The 90-minute boat ride to Klein Curaçao was among the roughest I’ve ever endured. Over and over again, we slammed headlong into huge waves, sending the bow of the ship meters into the air, and then crashing back down onto the water. Within minutes, everyone on-board was soaked to the bone, and many weren’t able to tolerate it. If you suffer from seasickness, or even suspect that you might, this might not be the right excursion for you. Seriously. There were a lot of people racing to the railings to empty their stomachs, and not all of them made it in time.

Everyone on the ship was overjoyed when we finally reached our destination. Immediately, Jürgen and I set out to explore, wanting to get away from the ship as swiftly as possible. Klein Curaçao is less than one square mile in size, so walking to the opposite shore required just a few minutes. On the way, we passed by an old lighthouse. Since the island is so small, its lighthouse was placed right in the middle, visible to ships on either side. We climbed up inside the tower, and although the top floor was locked off, were able to enjoy some nice views.

Klein Curacao

We continued east until arriving at the shipwreck of the Maria Bianca Guidesman oil tanker, which is totally rusted and slowly breaking apart under the pressure of the waves. This tanker ran ashore in the 1960s, and about half of its hull is still standing, with the wreckage of the other half strewn across the shore. We saw another, more modern wreck a few meters up the coast. There are apparently a few other boats which underestimated Klein Curaçao, but we didn’t take the time to search these out, as we were eager to return to the beach and get into the water.

The snorkeling is supposed to be great on Klein Curaçao, but maybe we didn’t find the best spot. We didn’t see much living coral or interesting sea life, and I was just about to label it “disappointing,” until we started spotting turtles. Klein Curaçao is mostly undisturbed by humanity and our destructive tendencies, and has long been an important breeding zone for sea turtles.

We never found much coral, but there was a short period during which we saw tons of fish. After our buffet lunch on the ship, the captain and his crew tossed the remaining food into the ocean. What ensued was a massive feeding frenzy underneath the ship. We jumped into the water with masks, and had front row seats for the crazy free-for-all.

Once we had finished swimming, eaten lunch, and cooked our bodies in the sun, it was time to head back to Curaçao. Given the rough outward journey, I was worried, but the return was a totally different experience. This time, we were moving in the direction of the waves. The captain even turned off the motor and foisted the sails, and we cruised back in style, stretched out on the catamaran’s tarp, with glasses of white wine in our hands.

Klein Curaçao is hard to recommend as an excursion for everyone. I’m not exaggerating the hellishness of the morning’s boat ride; it really is hard-core and the crew confirmed that this is always the case. After vomiting, the guy next to us had said, “Why am I on a boat to go to a beach, when I already flew to an island with so many beaches?” And it was hard to disagree with this logic. The beach at Klein Curaçao is great, but Curaçao has a lot of others which are even better. Although we had fun, and I’m glad we did it once, I’m not sure we’d want to repeat this particular adventure.

Location of Klein Curaçao on our Map

This is our underwater camera!

Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
Klein Curacao
, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
February 26, 2016 at 8:09 pm Comments (0)

Playa Cas Abou

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

A large, full-service beach between Playa Porto Mari and the beaches of San Juan, Playa Cas Abou is not a recommended destination when you feel like getting away from it all. But if you want an easy day on the sand, with food and drinks readily available, you could certainly do worse.

Cas Aboa

Cas Abou is yet another of Curaçao’s unfairly beautiful beaches. This long stretch of sand, with palm trees and crystal clear waters draws equal numbers of locals and tourists. You can walk right into the sea without worrying about hurting your feet on dead coral, and the sand is soft and comfortable. All the services you might expect can be found here, including a dive shop and a massage hut located right against the water.

Perhaps the only problem with Cas Abou is that it’s too nice, and attracts too many people. We visited twice, and both times had problems finding shade; there are no umbrellas, so everyone competes for the few areas protected by palm trees. The afternoon hours can get hot, and we even saw people laying right up against the side of the massage hut, trying to get into its shadow.

But if you don’t mind the sun, no problem. This is the kind of beach you’ll be happy to spend all day at. The entrance costs a little, as do the lounge chairs, but it’s not expensive, and you’re free to bring your own drinks and snacks.

Location on our Map

We Used This Camera For the Underwater Photos

Cas Aboa
Cas Aboa
Cas Aboa
Cas Aboa
Cas Aboa
Cas Aboa
Cas Aboa
Cas Aboa
Cas Aboa
, , , , , , , , ,
February 24, 2016 at 9:47 pm Comments (0)

The Beaches of San Juan

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Four beaches can be accessed from a single entry point near the northern town of Soto. At the former Landhuis of San Juan, you’ll be asked to pay a small entry fee before continuing along a set of dirt paths that lead to the sea. It’s up to you which path you take.

Each of San Juan’s four beaches are beautiful, and you might find yourself tempted to spend time at all of them. Working from north to south, the first you come across is Playa Chiki. The track which leads down to the beach is extremely rough, so we parked at the top of the hill and walked down, certain that our rental car wouldn’t be able to return back up this steep, uneven path of loose gravel.

The beach was gorgeous, and as small as we had reason to suspect (“chiki” is Papiamento for “small”). There were a few people here, including an enterprising couple who’d set up a hammock between two trees. Although we were sorely tempted to get into the water, we returned to the car and continued on our journey… this was going to be a long day, and we didn’t want to lose too much time at the first beach.

Playa Manzaliña was next. This is probably the most well-known of San Juan’s beaches, and for good reason: it’s large, quiet and stunning. Here, we were unable to resist the water’s siren call, and spent a long time swimming, snorkeling and laying out.

While in the water, we were able to see over to the next beach, Playa Shon Mosa, and could have easily swum over. This one is smaller than Manzaliña, but with finer sand and fewer visitors. But after lazing about Manzaliña for a couple hours, the day was getting late, so we decided to skip Shon Mosa and continue to beach number four.

Playa Largu, or “Long Beach,” is the southernmost of San Juan’s beaches, and also the one at which you’re least likely to spend the day. Not that it isn’t nice; it is. But the beach is made up mostly of dead coral, and there is precious little shade to be found. That said, there is at least one good reason to check out Playa Largu: the snorkeling is fantastic, with huge forests of Elkhorn Coral just off the coast, excellent visibility and hundreds of fish to be found.

Locations on our Map: Landhuis San Juan | Playa Chiki | Playa Manzaliña | Playa Shon Mosa | Playa Largu

Our Underwater Camera We Used For This Video

Snorkeling at Playa Largu
, , , , , , , ,
February 23, 2016 at 8:46 pm Comments (0)

A Birthday Celebration at Playa Forti

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

This year, we celebrated Jürgen’s birthday at Playa Forti. I wouldn’t be so crass as to reveal how old he was turning, but please let me reiterate that this birthday celebration was at Playa Forti. It was a wonderful spot to spend the morning, swim, snorkel… and to mourn the loss of fleeting youth.

Playa Forti

Almost immediately, Playa Forti worked its way into the top echelon of our favorite beaches on Curaçao. It has everything: beautiful rocky surroundings, glorious solitude, calm water, soft sand and excellent snorkeling. While in the water, we saw sea turtles, puffer fish and huge schools hiding in rocks along the shore. Forti is right next to Playa Piskado, and the snorkeling is similar. You can easily swim between the two.

But even more than the swimming, we loved the beach itself. You park at the top of a cliff which overlooks the scene, and then walk down a set of stairs to the sand. The beach is large and continues past an outcrop of the cliff which meets the water. We set up our towels on the other side of this rocky formation… there was a single palapa, which we claimed, and no other people. It couldn’t have been more perfect.

I don’t think we’re ever going to make a final decision as to our favorite beach on Curaçao, but Playa Forti would definitely be in the running. It doesn’t seem to be as popular as the Knip beaches, or nearby Playa Kalki; I’m not sure why. If you’re looking for an enjoyable, uncrowded day at the beach, definitely check out Playa Forti. Even if it’s not your birthday.

Location on our Map

Buy Your Underwater Camera Online

Playa Forti
Playa Forti
Playa Forti
Playa Forti

, , , , ,
February 14, 2016 at 7:22 pm Comments (3)

Diving at Directorsbaai and Double Reef

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

We had such a fun time diving with Scubacao, that we would have liked to get back into the water the very next day. However, Curaçao has a lot more to offer than scuba diving, so we forced ourselves to be patient. But after a month, we could wait no more. So we called up Anton and Marc, and were soon rumbling in Scubacao’s truck toward Directorsbaai.

When Anton suggested Directorsbaai as a potential for the day’s underwater adventure, we immediately agreed. We had already been snorkeling here, and knew that it would make for an amazing dive site with its dizzyingly steep drop-off just meters offshore.

Before we got into the water, Anton explained something we had wondered about the last time we visited Directorsbaai. There are a set of skinny metal pylons in the water, whose use we couldn’t figure out; they’re old and look too weak for mooring boats. Turns out, these were once part of a shark net meant to protect the Queen of the Netherlands, during her visit to the island decades ago. There’s never been a recorded shark attack in the history of Curaçao, but this is the Queen we’re talking about. Better to play it safe.

The net is long gone, but we swam around the coral-covered pylons, hoping to spot an elusive seahorse. Anton had seen a few around Directorsbaai, and knew the spots in which they might be found. Still, it was hard work; with their bodies covered in lichens, seahorses blend in perfectly to their surroundings, but Anton was eventually able to locate one of the little guys. They’re not exactly the most beautiful of God’s creatures, but unique and strange, and it was exciting to see one in its natural habitat.

We also managed to spot an octopus during our dive. Apparently, this guy is an old acquaintance of Anton’s, and can usually be found in the same place. The octopus is always attempting to hide, and Anton once saw him grab onto a clear beer bottle to use as a shield. Instead, with the bottle tipped up toward his face, it just looked like he was getting drunk. Today, he was content to stay motionless on top of a rock, and hope we didn’t see him. Sorry buddy, it didn’t work… smile for the camera!

After a short break, we moved on to our second site of the day near the Mundu Novo desalination plant in Otrobanda. We had visited this section of town a few days ago, but weren’t aware that it was also a good place to go diving. Anton parked at a small seafood shack, where we prepared our gear and walked into the water.

The coral reef here is in great shape, and the visibility was fantastic. This second dive was somewhat shallow, between six to ten meters, allowing us to remain underwater for a full hour. There was so much to see, I could have happily stayed for two more.

In a reef as pristine as this, stuff is happening everywhere, and it pays to look close. Anton found a rare type of shrimp hiding in sea anemone, and later handed me a flashlight, so that I could peer into the crevices of a wall. In almost every conceivable hiding spot, I saw a different fish lurking in the dark. We found two goldentail moray, spotted a barracuda swimming off in the distance, and followed around a cute puffer fish; I think of all the fish we saw in Curaçao’s water, the friendly, goofy-looking puffers might be my favorite.

Once we were finished, we sat down at the neighboring seafood shack and relaxed. Anton introduced us to the owner, Oscar, and then made us promise to return for a meal, here. After looking at the plates being served to the other tables, it was a promise we happily made… and kept!

We couldn’t have hoped to meet a better diving outfit than Scubacao. Not only did they take us to incredible sites, they also proved to be very knowledgeable about Curaçao. The first time I heard Anton carry on a conversation in Papiamento, I couldn’t believe it. We picked up quite a few tips, and learned a lot about the history and lifestyle of the island, just from spending time with them. If you’re looking for a great scuba experience, get in touch with Scubacao.

Locations on our Map: Directorsbaai | Oscar’s
Scubacao – Website

Travel Health Insurance Including Scuba Diving

Pictures from the Directorsbaai Dive
Photos from the Double Reef Dive
, , , , , , , ,
February 13, 2016 at 6:52 pm Comments (0)

Intrepid Explorers Discover Playa Hunku

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

We carefully made our way along an overgrown path, which, according to my calculations, had last been used by the Arwak Indians sometime in the late 1400s. Our mission was to find the legendary Playa Hunku, a place rumored about in whispered conversations across the island, but which no living man or woman had yet laid eyes upon. Our expedition was fraught with danger (cacti! mosquitoes!) but after a wearying trek of twenty entire minutes, we saw it: the fabled beach of Playa Hunku. And it was ours… all ours!!

Playa Hunky Curacao

The best part about this story is, I’m only exaggerating a little bit. Playa Hunku really is a hidden gem on Curaçao. Despite being so close to the popular resort of Playa Porto Mari, relatively few people know about it. We’ve even met locals who weren’t aware of its existence.

I hasten to point out that Playa Hunku is on private land. The road which leads there is closed, with signs indicating that trespassing is forbidden, and this might explain why the beach is almost always empty. But we checked with a few quasi-legitimate sources, all of whom assured us that it wouldn’t be a problem to walk over to the beach via the short path from Porto Mari. The owners don’t really care if the occasional tourist finds their way here, but they don’t want to open the road and have it become popular on a larger scale.

The path to Playa Hunku begins at the back of Porto Mari’s parking lot, with a brisk ascent up the Seru Mateo. From the top of this hill, you can look back for a nice view over the Playa Porto Mari… and it looks so beautiful, you’ll be tempted to run back down the hill and jump into the water. But press on, audacious adventurer! After a short hike of about twenty minutes, you’ll reach the other side of the hill, and be rewarded with your first glimpse of Playa Hunku. Note that the descent to the beach is steep and requires some caution.

The beach is a dream; a beautiful patch of sand, larger than we expected, with excellent snorkeling. While I was out by myself, a massive fish swam next to me, easily six feet long. I only spotted it from the corner of my eye, and wasn’t able to identify it before it swam swiftly away. In moments like this, logic flies out the window… I know there are no shark attacks on Curaçao. I know that. But I also know there’s always a first time. So I went into panic mode, swimming as swiftly as possible to shore. Later, Jürgen dared to go in after me, and got a better look at the same fish… it was a tuna.

We had an incredible time at Playa Hunku, and are loathe to write about it, since the magic of the place lies in its mystery and seclusion. But you’re reading this, which means you’re cool, so we’re letting you in on the tip. If you do go, please keep in mind that you’re a guest on private land. Don’t show up with a huge party, and (although it hardly needs said) make sure to clean up after yourself.

Get your Travel Health Insurance for Curacao, here!!!

Location on our Map
Our Route on Wikiloc

Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
, , , , , , , , , , ,
February 5, 2016 at 11:04 pm Comments (2)

Playa Jeremi

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Crystal blue waters, soft white sand, a laid-back atmosphere in a gorgeous natural environment… you know, it feels like I’ve been using this description a lot, doesn’t it? It’s getting boring. Come on, Curaçao! Why don’t you surprise us with an ugly beach?! Actually, on second thought, scratch that. Just keep the beauty coming and we’ll try not to complain. Next up: Playa Jeremi.

Playa Jeremi Curacao

Playa Jeremi is a medium-sized beach, just north past Lagun, perfect for when you want to be mostly left alone. There are a few palapas and a couple picnic tables. No lounge chairs, no beach bars. It’s moderately popular; rarely empty but almost never crowded. There are cliffs on either side of the blue water (which local kids often jump from), and the beach itself is both simple and beautiful.

Playa Jeremi Curacao

What else can I say? The snorkeling here is not magnificent — but that hardly even qualifies as a negative. After all, Playa Jeremi feels more like a place for hanging out with your friends and relaxing, and not so much for activities. Bring your own cooler with refreshments and snacks, and come for sunset; Jeremi is perfectly situated, facing west.

By the end of our time here, we’re going to be able to match each of Curaçao’s beaches to our current mood. Mambo for when we want to party, Santa Pretu for when we’re introspective, Knip when we want to have fun… and maybe Jeremi for when we want to do nothing but chill and simply enjoy being alive.

Location on our Map

List Of Underwater Cameras

Playa Jeremi Curacao
Playa Jeremi Curacao
Playa Jeremi Curacao
Playa Jeremi Curacao
Playa Jeremi Curacao
, , , , , , , , ,
February 2, 2016 at 10:55 pm Comments (0)

The Sea Turtles of Playa Piskado

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Playa Piskado’s name translates to “Fisherman’s Beach,” which is an apt description. Locals keep their tiny boats anchored just off-shore, here, and bring their daily catch to the small dock. But it’s not just fishermen that you’re likely to see at Playa Piskado; this is also a favorite haunt for Curaçao’s sea turtles.

Playa Piscado

I had been excited to see Playa Piskado’s turtles, and on arriving to the beach, ran straight into the water without bothering to ask Jürgen if he wanted to join me. I swam around for twenty minutes, but returned to our towels in failure. “No turtles here,” I huffed. “Stupid waste of time.”

Jürgen decided to give it a shot, anyway. Naturally, he came back with news that he had seen five turtles, and was just so delighted with himself. “Lying jerk.” It was a stupid accusation, of course, because Jürgen takes pictures of everything and had plenty of proof on his camera. And while showing me the snapshots, his stupid grin just got bigger and bigger.

I stomped back into the water, and this time I did see some turtles. I have no idea how I missed them the first time; it must have been bad luck, because they’re big and not at all skittish around humans. They won’t swim away from you and there’s no way you can overlook them. I floated for awhile above one turtle, watching him glide peacefully around, and felt my anger swiftly evaporating. Turtle-watching is a great sedative.

Playa Piscado

As I was coming out of the water, I saw that Jürgen had joined a crowd on the pier. A fisherman had just returned with a large tuna, and was showing it off. A group of guys took it from the boat, laid it on a small concrete table and began to cut it up, selling the fillets directly to the people who had gathered.

We loved Playa Piskado, as much for the turtles as for the exposure to local island life. There are a few palapas for shade, and the sand is nice to lay on. There aren’t a lot of services here, no lounge chairs or snack bars, but it’s an entertaining place to spend a few hours.

Location on our Map

Selection Of Different Snorkel Sets

Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
Playa Piscado
, , , , , , ,
January 30, 2016 at 7:41 pm Comments (0)

An Underwater Paradise at Directorsbaai

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

We were overwhelmed by the beauty of the underwater world we discovered at Directorsbaai. Pristine coral just a couple feet below the surface and legions of fish oblivious to our presence… if there’s better snorkeling anywhere on Curaçao, I’d be surprised. In fact, if there’s better snorkeling anywhere in the world, let us know. So far, Directorsbaai is about the best we’ve seen.

But you have to work for it. Directorsbaai is a lonely, deserted beach on the southern end of the Caracasbaai Peninsula. If you’re at all familiar with life on Curaçao, you’ll know that “lonely and deserted” means “popular with thieves.” When talking about our plans to snorkel at Directorsbaai, we were warned repeatedly not to leave anything on the beach there, nor to leave the car untended.

“What you should do,” a friend of ours said, “is snorkel all the way from Directorsbaai to Tugboat Beach.” Sounded like a good idea, so we forced him to come along, which would allow us to take shifts. First, I dropped Jürgen and him off at Directorsbaai, waited until they were in the water, and then drove myself over to Tugboat Beach. Twenty minutes later, they were stepping out of the water with grins so large, I knew the trip had been a success. And I could hardly wait for my turn.

This short snorkeling tour starts off scary; at Directorsbaai, the drop-off into the deep ocean is close to shore, and it’s terrifying to suddenly be hovering over water so deep you can’t possibly see the bottom. Also, you have to swim around a rocky outcrop popular with fishermen before getting to the good stuff. But once you’re past that, the rest is paradise. I’ve never seen such a beautiful underwater landscape, and when the sun is shining, the scene is unbelievable.

The swim to Tugboat Beach goes faster than I had expected. At a steady pace, I could’ve done it in fifteen minutes. But there’s so much to see, you’ll want to linger. I spotted puffer fish, angel fish, trumpet fish half a meter long and a barracuda, among hundreds of other species. And the coral stays in good shape all the way to the sunken tugboat itself.

It takes a little planning and coordination, but this self-guided snorkel tour is easy enough, and so memorable that it’s worth the effort. Just remember not to leave anything unguarded at Directorsbaai… or anywhere on the island, for that matter.

Locations on our Map: Directorsbaai | Tugboat Beach

Great Selection Of Underwater Cameras

, , , , , , , , , ,
January 28, 2016 at 10:48 pm Comment (1)

« Older Posts

The Blue Room An almost entirely submerged cave found in the cliffs of the western coast, the Blue Room is one of the island's most famous snorkeling spots, second perhaps only to the Tugboat. We visited it during our last week on Curaçao, and found it to be just as beautiful as advertised.
For 91 Days