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The Cliffs and Caves of Hato Plains

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The deserted section of coastline to the northwest of Curaçao’s international airport is known as the Hato Plains. There are no paved roads here, but if you have a jeep, this wide expanse of dry red earth trapped between the ocean and a set of inland cliffs is a fascinating area to explore.

Jeep Tour Hato Plains

We rented a jeep for a single day, with the sole purpose of visiting Hato Plains. As luck would have it, the weather turned out to be miserable and rainy, but we were compelled to stick with the plan. Rental jeeps aren’t cheap, and it’s not like we could change the reservation at the last minute. Oh well, when hiking in temperatures as hot as Curaçao’s, rain can be a blessing.

A small access road leads from the airport onto the plains. This initial section is popular with plane-spotters, because airplanes take off and land right overhead. We saw a few people waiting with binoculars, possibly hoping to see the jumbo KLM jet which arrives daily from Amsterdam.

We parked our jeep at a few different spots along the way, the first being Cueba Shingot, a cave near the coast. The entrance is just a hole on the ground, barely visible on the flat earth of the plains, but the cavern is larger than it first appears, and you can walk quite far into the dark; care is required, though, because this close to the ocean, the rocks are slick.

Next, we returned further inland and parked our car near the cliffs, to look for a trail that was supposed to lead us to a series of caves. But this trail was almost impossible to find. Hato Plains is not developed as a tourism sight, meaning that there are very few signs for independent hikers. It took a lot of hunting along the cliffs before we finally saw a marker pointing to the Cueba di Pachi. One problem: the sign was pointed directly up.

Jeep Tour Hato Plains

Mountain climbing is not our strong suit, but the terrace was only a few meters above the ground, and so we clambered up the rocks. The Cueba di Pachi was smaller and spookier than Shingot had been, and we explored it for only a couple seconds, chased off by the bats swooping past our heads. But we stayed on top of the cliffs, and followed a trail which led us an even smaller and spookier cave called Cueba Mirador, whose entrance was entirely overgrown.

Having returned along the path back down to the plains, we walked for a long time along the foot of the cliffs. This was the highlight of the day; every few minutes, we would discuss whether we should turn around, but the nature was so strange and beautiful, that we didn’t want to miss anything, and we pressed on much farther than we probably should have, considering the bad weather.

Jeep Tour Hato Plains

We drove through the remainder of the Hato Plains, slowly approaching a set of towering windmills on the horizon. Near the end of the park, we found something called the “Sabana di Arte,” where a local artist has incorporated the terrain into a series of weird art pieces: a section of jagged rock elaborated to resemble a dragon, for example, or wall paintings of local fauna.

We exited the park at the private farm of San Pedro, where there was a locked gate. Accessing the Hato Plains from the airport is free, but on the northern end, you have to pay the landowners a few guilders to get out. It’s worth it, to avoid the long drive back. Although we returned home wet and exhausted, it had been a fun day and we were in good spirits.

Locations on our Map: Cueba Shingot | Cueba di Pashi | Sabana di Arte

One Day Jeep Rental In Curacao

Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
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February 8, 2016 at 10:51 pm Comments (0)

Intrepid Explorers Discover Playa Hunku

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We carefully made our way along an overgrown path, which, according to my calculations, had last been used by the Arwak Indians sometime in the late 1400s. Our mission was to find the legendary Playa Hunku, a place rumored about in whispered conversations across the island, but which no living man or woman had yet laid eyes upon. Our expedition was fraught with danger (cacti! mosquitoes!) but after a wearying trek of twenty entire minutes, we saw it: the fabled beach of Playa Hunku. And it was ours… all ours!!

Playa Hunky Curacao

The best part about this story is, I’m only exaggerating a little bit. Playa Hunku really is a hidden gem on Curaçao. Despite being so close to the popular resort of Playa Porto Mari, relatively few people know about it. We’ve even met locals who weren’t aware of its existence.

I hasten to point out that Playa Hunku is on private land. The road which leads there is closed, with signs indicating that trespassing is forbidden, and this might explain why the beach is almost always empty. But we checked with a few quasi-legitimate sources, all of whom assured us that it wouldn’t be a problem to walk over to the beach via the short path from Porto Mari. The owners don’t really care if the occasional tourist finds their way here, but they don’t want to open the road and have it become popular on a larger scale.

The path to Playa Hunku begins at the back of Porto Mari’s parking lot, with a brisk ascent up the Seru Mateo. From the top of this hill, you can look back for a nice view over the Playa Porto Mari… and it looks so beautiful, you’ll be tempted to run back down the hill and jump into the water. But press on, audacious adventurer! After a short hike of about twenty minutes, you’ll reach the other side of the hill, and be rewarded with your first glimpse of Playa Hunku. Note that the descent to the beach is steep and requires some caution.

The beach is a dream; a beautiful patch of sand, larger than we expected, with excellent snorkeling. While I was out by myself, a massive fish swam next to me, easily six feet long. I only spotted it from the corner of my eye, and wasn’t able to identify it before it swam swiftly away. In moments like this, logic flies out the window… I know there are no shark attacks on Curaçao. I know that. But I also know there’s always a first time. So I went into panic mode, swimming as swiftly as possible to shore. Later, Jürgen dared to go in after me, and got a better look at the same fish… it was a tuna.

We had an incredible time at Playa Hunku, and are loathe to write about it, since the magic of the place lies in its mystery and seclusion. But you’re reading this, which means you’re cool, so we’re letting you in on the tip. If you do go, please keep in mind that you’re a guest on private land. Don’t show up with a huge party, and (although it hardly needs said) make sure to clean up after yourself.

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Location on our Map
Our Route on Wikiloc

Playa Hunky Curacao
Playa Hunky Curacao
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February 5, 2016 at 11:04 pm Comments (2)

Driving Around the Christoffelpark

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After having hiked to the top of Christoffelberg, we had enough time to continue exploring the park. A driving route recommended by the visitor’s center brought us to a few interesting sights, including a remote beach, a dark cave, and ancient rock paintings made by the Arwak Indians.

Christoffel Park Drive

The hike had left us so exhausted, that even a driving route sounded unappealing. “You mean we have to press down on the gas, and turn the wheel? Unnhhhh… god!” But entrance to the park is expensive enough that we didn’t want to pay to return another day, so we sucked it up and motored off into the nature. Heroic.

Christoffel Park Drive

The first stop was at a viewpoint overlooking the park. When the skies are exceptionally clear, you can supposedly see Bonaire from here. That wasn’t the case today, but we did have a nice view of Boka Grandi: the large inlet and beach that would be the next stop on our tour.

After relaxing on the sand, and nearly allowing the sound of the waves to put us to sleep, we hopped back into the car and continued for a few more minutes until reaching the cave. It was much bigger than we had expected, and we were able to crawl back far into its depths, where very little light was able to reach.

Christoffel Park Drive

Next to the cave is a set of rock paintings attributed to the Arwak Indians who were Curaçao’s original inhabitants. These paintings are thought to be up to 2000 years old. It can be hard to spot them, as they’ve faded with time, but the red markings are still visible on the rock.

Most visitors come to Christoffelpark to hike up Christoffelberg, and then they leave right away. But there’s a lot more to the park than just the mountain, including the excellent Savonet Museum and this driving tour. It’s an easy way to discover some additional highlights of Curaçao’s biggest national park.

Location on our Map: Boka Grandi

Best Curacao Rental Car Prices

Christoffel Park Drive
Christoffel Park Drive
Christoffel Park Drive
Christoffel Park Drive
Christoffel Park Drive
Christoffel Park Drive
Christoffel Park Drive
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February 5, 2016 at 9:11 pm Comments (0)

Playa Jeremi

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Crystal blue waters, soft white sand, a laid-back atmosphere in a gorgeous natural environment… you know, it feels like I’ve been using this description a lot, doesn’t it? It’s getting boring. Come on, Curaçao! Why don’t you surprise us with an ugly beach?! Actually, on second thought, scratch that. Just keep the beauty coming and we’ll try not to complain. Next up: Playa Jeremi.

Playa Jeremi Curacao

Playa Jeremi is a medium-sized beach, just north past Lagun, perfect for when you want to be mostly left alone. There are a few palapas and a couple picnic tables. No lounge chairs, no beach bars. It’s moderately popular; rarely empty but almost never crowded. There are cliffs on either side of the blue water (which local kids often jump from), and the beach itself is both simple and beautiful.

Playa Jeremi Curacao

What else can I say? The snorkeling here is not magnificent — but that hardly even qualifies as a negative. After all, Playa Jeremi feels more like a place for hanging out with your friends and relaxing, and not so much for activities. Bring your own cooler with refreshments and snacks, and come for sunset; Jeremi is perfectly situated, facing west.

By the end of our time here, we’re going to be able to match each of Curaçao’s beaches to our current mood. Mambo for when we want to party, Santa Pretu for when we’re introspective, Knip when we want to have fun… and maybe Jeremi for when we want to do nothing but chill and simply enjoy being alive.

Location on our Map

List Of Underwater Cameras

Playa Jeremi Curacao
Playa Jeremi Curacao
Playa Jeremi Curacao
Playa Jeremi Curacao
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February 2, 2016 at 10:55 pm Comments (0)

An Underwater Paradise at Directorsbaai

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We were overwhelmed by the beauty of the underwater world we discovered at Directorsbaai. Pristine coral just a couple feet below the surface and legions of fish oblivious to our presence… if there’s better snorkeling anywhere on Curaçao, I’d be surprised. In fact, if there’s better snorkeling anywhere in the world, let us know. So far, Directorsbaai is about the best we’ve seen.

But you have to work for it. Directorsbaai is a lonely, deserted beach on the southern end of the Caracasbaai Peninsula. If you’re at all familiar with life on Curaçao, you’ll know that “lonely and deserted” means “popular with thieves.” When talking about our plans to snorkel at Directorsbaai, we were warned repeatedly not to leave anything on the beach there, nor to leave the car untended.

“What you should do,” a friend of ours said, “is snorkel all the way from Directorsbaai to Tugboat Beach.” Sounded like a good idea, so we forced him to come along, which would allow us to take shifts. First, I dropped Jürgen and him off at Directorsbaai, waited until they were in the water, and then drove myself over to Tugboat Beach. Twenty minutes later, they were stepping out of the water with grins so large, I knew the trip had been a success. And I could hardly wait for my turn.

This short snorkeling tour starts off scary; at Directorsbaai, the drop-off into the deep ocean is close to shore, and it’s terrifying to suddenly be hovering over water so deep you can’t possibly see the bottom. Also, you have to swim around a rocky outcrop popular with fishermen before getting to the good stuff. But once you’re past that, the rest is paradise. I’ve never seen such a beautiful underwater landscape, and when the sun is shining, the scene is unbelievable.

The swim to Tugboat Beach goes faster than I had expected. At a steady pace, I could’ve done it in fifteen minutes. But there’s so much to see, you’ll want to linger. I spotted puffer fish, angel fish, trumpet fish half a meter long and a barracuda, among hundreds of other species. And the coral stays in good shape all the way to the sunken tugboat itself.

It takes a little planning and coordination, but this self-guided snorkel tour is easy enough, and so memorable that it’s worth the effort. Just remember not to leave anything unguarded at Directorsbaai… or anywhere on the island, for that matter.

Locations on our Map: Directorsbaai | Tugboat Beach

Great Selection Of Underwater Cameras

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January 28, 2016 at 10:48 pm Comment (1)

The Mansions of Scharloo

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Found across the Waaigat Bay from Punda, Scharloo is the newest of Willemstad’s four historic districts and, as evidenced by its abundance of stately mansions, was home to Curaçao’s richest citizens. Today, the wealthy have moved on to other neighborhoods, but the mansions have remained.

Scharloo Mansions Willemstad

Because it was outside of the city walls, Scharloo had been considered an undesirable place to live for much of Willemstad’s early history. It wasn’t until the 1870s that the neighborhood came into fashion. Jewish merchants were the first to recognize its potential and mansions began to spring up along Scharlooweg. The process only accelerated after Pietermaai was devastated by a hurricane in 1877, prompting Curaçao’s elite to look for a more secure home.

But the glory days of Scharloo were short-lived. The grand residences are still there, but few (if any) of them are owned by families as private homes. Some have been bought by businesses, others by the state, and a considerable number have been left to deteriorate.

Scharloo Mansions Willemstad

We took a stroll through the Scharloo on a quiet Sunday afternoon, and found the vibe to be more of “desolate creepiness” than “refined opulence.” All the stores were closed, and the only people we encountered were two drunk guys, one of whom decided that he was going to give us a tour of the neighborhood, protests to the contrary be damned. Luckily, stumbling drunks are easy to outdistance.

But the mansions in the Scharloo really are amazing. Most of them are on Scharlooweg, the long street which runs parallel to the Waaigat Harbor. Just like all the houses on Curaçao, Scharloo’s mansions come in a rainbow of vibrant color. Forest green, cotton candy pink, blood red, sky blue, and all of them with neoclassical flourishes like white columns, triangular pediments and decorated cornices.

Scharloo’s golden age might have come to an end, but that doesn’t mean its story is over. Seeing the potential in the neighborhood’s grand architecture, investors have been renovating them as guesthouses and boutique hotels, similar to what’s already happened in Pietermaai. Although we love the romantic and mysterious atmosphere generated by huge, dilapidated mansions, it’s a good thing that this historic neighborhood isn’t being totally neglected.

Location of Scharlooweg on our Map

Cheap Flights To Curacao

Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
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Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
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Scharloo Mansions Willemstad
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January 18, 2016 at 11:06 pm Comments (0)

Fort St. Michiel and Boka Sami

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After visiting Boka Sami and the dilapidated Fort St. Michiel, we found a trail which led up the hill and along the cliffs to Vaersenbaai, home to Kokomo Beach. A short, mildly strenuous walk through the woods, followed by views over the Caribbean, and then cooling off in clear blue waters? Sigh, if only all our hikes were like this!

The trail begins at Boka Sami, where you crossing a small footbridge spanning the inlet which feeds into St. Michiel’s Bay. There’s an excellent hike which leads around this lagoon, where you can almost always see flamingos, but that would be for another day; today we were going up into the hills.

The great majority of the trail is uphill through a dense forest. The path is well-worn, so there’s no need to worry about getting lost, but it feels almost forgotten. The only other living being we saw on the trail was a white-tailed deer, far up ahead of us; it spotted us immediately and darted off into the woods before we could get a picture.

Soon enough, the trail reached the coast, giving us a view from the clifftops over the Caribbean’s crystalline waters. We walked along the rocks, discovering the paltry remains of Fort Vaersenbaai, which once protected the bay, and rested at a picnic table which has been set up for people to enjoy the panorama.

We now descended to the beach, where we spent the rest of the day swimming, snorkeling, laying out and eating at Kokomo Beach’s restaurant. On the advice of Anton from Scubaçao, we ordered the nachos. It was a huge plate, for an incredible price. As we were eating, a pair of fearless iguanas inched along the railing, ever closer to our table, before finally walking straight onto it. Who knew iguanas craved nachos?

We had left our car at Boka Sami, so after lazing about and stuffing ourselves, we had to hike back on the same path we’d come by. No problem; it’s just a couple kilometers long, and helped us digest all those nachos. Overall, this had been an easy, trouble-free excursion, perfect for anyone who likes to combine beach days with a little exercise and nature.

Locations on our Map: Fort St. Michiel | Boka Sami

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January 7, 2016 at 7:55 pm Comment (1)

A Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa

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Playa Kanoa, on the windward side of Curaçao, isn’t what comes to mind when you think “idyllic Caribbean beach.” Like the rest of the eastern coast, it’s subject to strong winds and rough water. But although big, consistent waves make swimming more difficult, I can think of at least one thing they’re good for. Surf’s on!

Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa

We visited Playa Kanoa during the island’s annual Surfing Championship, which is held in December. There was quite a crowd on hand to cheer on the amateur athletes as they braved the waves, and we grabbed seats atop a pair of wooden pallets that someone had thoughtfully set up along the jagged rocks of the shore.

Before arriving, we had been warned that “Curaçao ain’t Hawaii,” so not to expect anything major at the surfing championships. Indeed, the waves weren’t all that epic, but they were big enough for the better surfers in the competition to execute some cool tricks. With its steady, non-lethal waves, Playa Kanoa looks like a good place to learn the sport.

Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa

We stayed at the tournament for about an hour, our attention split equally between the surfers riding high on the waves, the surfers stripping down on the shore (hey, surfers tend to be good-looking), and a hilarious French Bulldog causing chaos among the competitors and the audience. We were able to watch both the men and women’s categories, and also see a group of body-boarders hit the waves.

Further down the shore from the competition, we found a small inlet which is naturally protected from the waves. Here, kids were playing in the water and a few people were laying out on the sand. It’s in no way comparable to the beautiful beaches of the island’s western side, but looked like a nice place to hang out.

Location on our Map

Buy Your Surfboard Online

Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
Surf Championship at Playa Kanoa
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January 5, 2016 at 9:53 pm Comments (0)

Bon Pascu i un Felis Aña Nobo!

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It’s always fun to see how people around the world celebrate the holiday season. Every culture that recognizes Christmas has its own traditions, and New Year’s Eve can be wildly different depending on the country you’re in. We suspected that Curaçao would turn New Year’s into one big, loud, outdoor party… and we weren’t wrong!

Neither Jürgen nor I have ever been Christmas guys, and in Curaçao, it was especially difficult to get into the holiday spirit. I mean, it’s 29° (85°F) out and we’re at the beach! Our families are far away, we don’t have a tree, and we didn’t even think about presents. Just being in Curaçao seemed a good enough gift.

Curacao Christmas

But if we weren’t in the Christmas spirit, it’s not because Curaçao wasn’t trying. Curaçaoans love the holiday. People buy Christmas trees (despite firs not being exactly native to the island), string lights up along their houses, and play Christmas music… often songs we know, but with a Latin twist. Sons and daughters living overseas come home, and families get together to celebrate around a pan di jamón: a Christmas sweet bread stuffed with ham, raisins and olives.

Santa Claus doesn’t visit Curaçao. Instead, the gift-giving duties are taken over by Sinterklaas, who arrives on December 5th. This is the big day for the children, when they get most of their gifts. Historically, Sinterklaas has been accompanied by Zwarte Piet, an assistant dressed as a minstrel and wearing blackface. Unsurprisingly, Zwarte Piet is a tradition in decline, although you can still find his grinning face on Christmas cookies in the supermarket.

Although Jürgen and I mostly sat Christmas out, we made up for it on New Year’s Eve, an event which Curaçao goes crazy for. You don’t have to be around Curaçoans for too long before realizing that they love to party, and New Year’s Eve is the perfect opportunity. It’s a big day, and they get started early; by noon, we were already drinking beer at an event in Pietermaai where they’d be celebrating with something called a “pagara.”

Pagaras are super-loud, super-long strings of fireworks which are set off all over the city, all day long on New Year’s Eve. At two kilometers in length, Pietersmaai has one of the biggest, and we watched the whole thing explode, deafened by the noise and choking on the smoke. It was awesome… though it was probably a good thing that we already had a few drinks in us. My ears were still ringing the next day.

The pagara reminded us both of the noise fireworks called mascletàs, from our home town of Valencia. But we had no time to wallow in nostalgia, because we had to hurry to Otrobanda for another party, and another pagara. This was a more private affair, to which we had been invited by a friend. Before the firecrackers got going, there was a band playing tambu music. This is a style of music originally from Africa, and today the band was singing about the year that was, improvising lyrics which lampooned the island’s problems and politicians.

A couple hours before midnight, we walked down to Brionplein, where seemingly every person on the island had congregated to usher in the New Year. We found spots to sit on the Queen Emma Bridge, and waited for the hour to strike. When it happened, fireworks exploded in the sky all around us; from the wharf, from Fort Amsterdam, from somewhere in Otrobanda, and we shared hugs and kisses with the total strangers who happened to be standing near us. It was a fantastic way to ring in 2016, and the best New Year’s we’ve had in a long time.

Curacao Christmas
Curacao Christmas
Curacao Christmas
Curacao Christmas
Zwarte Piet
Curacao Christmas
Curacao Christmas
Curacao Christmas
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January 2, 2016 at 10:40 pm Comment (1)

Diving with the Guys from Subcacao

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Curaçao is a paradise for scuba divers. The coral reefs are in good condition, the visibility is usually excellent, the water is warm, and most of the best diving sites are ones to which you can swim from shore. We couldn’t wait to begin exploring Curaçao’s underwater world, and were invited to check it out with the two-man team of Scubacao.

Anton from Belgium and Marc from the Netherlands started Scubacao about three years ago. They met while working at other Curaçaoan scuba shops, and were soon kicking around the idea of starting their own business. Slowly but surely, they began to save money and buy equipment. One day, Marc looked around at what they had so far accumulated, and said to Anton: “I think that’s it. We have a scuba shop!”

Scubacao has since grown in leaps and bounds, and they’re now among the most popular companies on an island full of them (at least fifty other dive shops operate on Curaçao). Marc and Anton have a lot of knowledge about the island; Anton told us that he’s made almost a thousand dives at Curaçao. After booking a trip, one of the guys will pick you up, and drive directly to the location chosen for the day’s adventure.

Our initial dive site was Vaersenbaai, home of Kokomo Beach Club. Jürgen and I were a little rusty, since it had been well over a year since our last dive, but Anton gave us a solid refresher course and was careful to make sure that we still knew what we were doing. Professionalism is a big part of Scubacao’s appeal; Marc and Anton are both young guys who have fun doing their job, but they’re also serious and responsible when it comes to safety.

We were a little anxious getting into the water, but calmed down once we were a few meters deep, and enjoyed one of the best dives we’ve ever had. The visibility was glorious, and with the sun shining, Curaçao’s underwater world came into vivid life. Anton pointed out strange creatures like the lionfish, nearly transparent shrimp, and the rare flamingo tongue snail. We swam out to investigate a sunken barge known as “The Platform” and, before I knew it, our time was up and we had to return to shore.

On the way to our second dive, I had asked Anton about sea snakes. He said not to worry, that there aren’t any in Curaçao’s waters. And right then, we pull into a place called Snake Bay, and I was like… “Liar.” He laughed and told us that the name refers to eels which look like snakes. “I promise there are no real snakes!” (I researched later, and discovered he was telling the truth; sea snakes are not found anywhere in the Caribbean.)

The second dive was perhaps even better than the first, if only because Jürgen and I were now more comfortable in the water. The entrance was a little trickier, as we had to negotiate a rocky ramp leading into the water, with quite a bit of current. But once we were underwater, we were fine. Snake Bay had incredible visibility, thousands of fish, a beautiful living reef, and no snakes.

This was our first experience scuba diving in Curaçao, and we couldn’t have hoped for a better one. Marc and Anton are great guys, and just a lot of fun to be around. If you’re looking for an amazing experience under the water, look them up.

Locations on our Map: Vaersenbaai | Snake Bay
Scubacao: Website

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More Images from Vaersenbaai
More Images from Snake Bay
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December 30, 2015 at 11:01 pm Comments (0)

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The Cliffs and Caves of Hato Plains The deserted section of coastline to the northwest of Curaçao's international airport is known as the Hato Plains. There are no paved roads here, but if you have a jeep, this wide expanse of dry red earth trapped between the ocean and a set of inland cliffs is a fascinating area to explore.
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