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Ayo, Dushi Kòrsou!

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Coming on the heels of one of the most difficult years we’ve ever endured, Jürgen and I had been desperate for a relaxing and stress-free 91 days. With its chilled-out atmosphere, low-adrenaline activities, friendly people, comforting cuisine, and an infectiously fun culture and all packed into one, small, easily manageable island, Curaçao was exactly what we needed. We couldn’t have made a better choice.

It was the beaches that first won our hearts. Soon after arriving, we drove to the northern tip of the island and laid our eyes upon Grote Knip — it was as though someone had plugged a USB cable into my brain, ordered me to concentrate on the phrase “Caribbean Dream Beach,” and had then printed out the mental image. And as our time on Curaçao progressed, we would find plenty of other beaches that were just as good, or even better. In the foreseeable future, when I feel stress setting in, I’ll just close my eyes and repeat the mantra, “Knip. Forti. Daaiboi. Hunku.” Take me back to the Caribbean!

But one can only enjoy so much beach time before one starts to get restless. Luckily, this island offers a number of other activities, including some excellent hikes. Excellent, but never all that strenuous. Loops around Patrick, St. Michielsbaai and Ascension are both beautiful and simple. Even the island’s highest peak, the Christoffelberg, takes no longer than 90 minutes to ascend. Oh Curaçao, even when you’re trying to be hardcore, you just can’t help yourself. Everything on this island is easy!

I mean that: everything is easy! Try to get along with the locals. Guess what? It’s easy. Before the words “Bon dia” have even left your tongue, the person you’re talking with has already greeted you in four different languages, and shook your hand, and slapped you on the back, and asked your name. They’re so friendly, you don’t even have to try.

Oh shoot, it’s raining. Don’t worry, even bad weather in Curaçao is easy. Look again — in the time it’s taken to read this sentence, the rain has already stopped. Wait, look again: now the sun has come out. During our time on the island, we had exactly one day of truly bad weather. That’s 1 out of 91… during winter. And now you start to understand why everyone’s always smiling. They have it good here, and they know it.

Interested in scuba diving? By now, it shouldn’t surprise you to learn that scuba diving on Curaçao is easy. All the best sites are accessible from shore, so there’s no need to rent a boat, and you never have to dive very deep. Even easier is the snorkeling. Directorsbaai, Tugboat, the Blue Room, Kalki… with no effort at all, you can see some underwater landscapes that you’ll never forget.

And then there’s the food; easy and familiar dishes like barbecue ribs, meat stews, and fish fried Caribbean-style with herbs and limes. Almost everything we ordered here was delicious, and none of it required any special culinary courage to enjoy. Like we said: easy.

Is Curaçao without problems? Of course not. There’s the Isla Refinery and the stinky veneer of smoke it spreads over half the island. There’s too much crime, and the driving habits of the people border on the outrageous. But these are problems which most countries suffer from. There’s a tendency among tourists to view Curaçao solely as a vacation destination, and to forget that it’s a real country… and then be “shocked” when confronted with something dirty or bad. Yes, there are problems here. Just like everywhere.

For us, we’ll take a place like Curaçao over any destination whose sole focus is on the comfort of tourists. This is an island with its own vibrant culture — just watching the celebrations of Carnival confirms that! I mean, anyone is welcome to watch these parades and parties, with their all-night dancing and drinking, but they’re not meant for the amusement of tourists; Carnival is for the Curaçaoans. And the the island has real history, too, not all of it comfortable. Curaçao was one of the main hubs of the Atlantic slave trade, and much of the current population is descended directly from those who fought, often violently, against the chains which bound them… chains placed by the ancestors of the very tourists who are today so amicably welcomed as guests.

Curaçao is simply an incredible place. It’s small but has tremendous depth, with enough culture and experiences for a country ten times its size, and a heart that is simply bursting with warmth. It’s impossible to spend time among the people of Curaçao without becoming completely enchanted with them.

Like I said earlier, Curaçao was exactly what we needed. It had been a difficult year for us, with serious measures of personal grief and loss, and we had become disenchanted with certain aspects of life. Turns out that, for us, the best antidote to despondency was to dunk ourselves completely in a culture where life is fully enjoyed, where every day is a gift, where the sun is almost always shining, the water is always warm, your neighbor is always smiling, and everything is wonderfully, gloriously easy.

Thanks for picking us back up, Curaçao. We’ll be in your debt for awhile.

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March 5, 2016 at 5:00 pm Comments (6)

Drag Racing in Curaçao

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Drag racing is a phenomenon across the Caribbean, and Curaçao is no exception. When the races are on, hundreds of people cram into the stands to watch tuned-up cars and tricked-out motorcycles squeal down the track. Our last Sunday on the island coincided with the first day of the season, so we decided to check it out.

Drag Racing Curacao

Jürgen and I are not exactly racing fans. In fact, until now, the only “Drag Race” I had been familiar with was the one hosted by RuPaul. I had never attended any sort of motorsports event, whether NASCAR, Formula 1, or Motocross, and never felt like I was missing out. But for whatever reason, I was excited to see the Curaçao drag races on Sunday night. Who knew? Maybe RuPaul would be there!

We showed up, expecting to see some sweet cars, gleaming and polished, perhaps sporting racing stripes and definitely with huge spoilers and other crazy custom modifications. So, when a little Volkswagen Polo pulled up to the starting line, I was confused. “Surely, it’s just the test car,” I reasoned. But no, this was one of the racers, and much of its competition was in a similar category. These were the types of cars I frequently overtake on the way to the supermarket… in fact, I’m pretty sure that they were those cars!

Drag Racing Curacao

So, I had to adjust my expectations for the day, especially after watching a Vespa “blaze” down the track and shatter exactly zero world speed records. But there was something cool about the fact that seemingly anyone could race with any kind of vehicle. And as the day went along, the cooler cars started to show up; the kinds you’d expect to see at a Caribbean drag race. They’d rev their engines before starting, producing billows of smoke while waiting for the green light, then peel down the track, racing two at a time.

Even better than the cars were the motorcycles, many of which were tricked-out and extremely cool. The guys (and a girl) who drive them are insane! I don’t know how many times my heart jumped, watching them nearly lose control after blasting off down the track. We didn’t see any wipeouts, but they must happen frequently.

Drag Racing Curacao

The races started at four in the afternoon, but the crowds didn’t start showing up until about six. The racing strip is on an elevated plain, and there’s a nice view, especially when the sun starts to go down. Considering that this was a relatively unimportant race day, we were surprised by the number of spectators. Later during the season, for the bigger events, the stands can be packed to capacity.

If you’re a fan of racing, check out the Speedway’s website, where you’ll find a calendar of upcoming events. It makes for an entertaining Sunday evening, and provides a reminder that Curaçao isn’t just about tranquil beaches and nature… they like their action, too.

Location of the Track
Curaçao International Speedway – Website

Rent A Car In Curacao

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March 1, 2016 at 3:45 pm Comments (0)

The Blue Room

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An almost entirely submerged cave found in the cliffs of the western coast, the Blue Room is one of the island’s most famous snorkeling spots, second perhaps only to the Tugboat. We visited it during our last week on Curaçao, and found it to be just as beautiful as advertised.

The Blue Room is exactly what you think it’s going to be: a cave totally bathed in a deep, blue light. There’s always room between the water’s surface and the ceiling of the cave, so you can swim into it without worries. If you go all the way to the end of the room and look back toward the entrance, the effect is stunning, especially on a sunny afternoon when the light illuminates everything to perfection.

It’s possible to hire a boat to take you to the Blue Room, but it’s just as easy to walk over along the path which starts at the Santa Cruz Beach, and this is what we did. The biggest advantage of the boat is that you’ll have someone to watch your stuff. The Blue Room is notorious for thieves, who lurk in the woods and wait for their victims to leave their belongings unattended.

Let me repeat that: the Blue Room is notorious for thieves. We’re friends with a couple who visited the Blue Room about a week before us. They knew about the danger of theft, so made sure to hide their stuff carefully before entering the water. But they were being watched, and when they came out of the water, everything was gone: wallets, clothes, car keys, shoes. It is not enough to hide your possessions, you absolutely have to leave someone as a guard. For that reason, it’s most fun to do the Blue Room if you’re in a group of at least three.

Even considering this, we cannot bring ourselves to recommend the boat trip to the Blue Room offered by “Captain Goodlife,” who operates from Santa Cruz. During our short interaction with him, he was unbelievably rude — as soon as he realized we just wanted information and weren’t planning to hire him, his friendly demeanor vanished and he refused to offer us any advice. Our unlucky friends reported a similar experience. He owns the nearest shop, and so was the first person they went to after having their things stolen. He scoffed at their situation, and said something to the effect of “serves you right” [for walking along the path, instead of booking a tour with him].

Wait a second… how did this article about an amazing natural phenomenon get hijacked by thieves and rude business owners?! Let’s get back to the good stuff. We loved the Blue Room. It’s not extra-large, and you can see the whole thing in just a few minutes, but we were so entranced by the gorgeous colors, we stayed until our skin started to wrinkle.

Getting into the water is easy enough, as you can jump from the rocks, but exiting is a little more problematic. You really have to pull yourself up onto the rocks, so you have to be in decent condition. It’s not overly hard, but just be aware that there isn’t a ladder or anything to help you leave the water.

If you enjoy snorkeling and are on Curaçao for any length of time, you owe it to yourself to check out the Blue Room. The walk to the cave takes about twenty minutes from Santa Cruz, and with proper precautions, it can be enjoyed without worry.

Location our Map
The Path to the Blue Room on Wikiloc

This Is Our Underwater Camera

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February 27, 2016 at 9:44 pm Comments (5)

A Trip to Klein Curaçao

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Klein Curaçao, a small, uninhabited island found a few miles southeast of Curaçao, has become a popular destination for day trips, thanks to its pristine beach, excellent snorkeling, and atmosphere of forsaken solitude. We booked an excursion which brought us to the island on a catamaran, and spent the day checking it out.

Klein Curacao

There are a number of operators which offer trips to Klein Curaçao, but we decided to book with Bounty Adventures, on the recommendation of a friend. And it turns out that the word “Adventure” in the company’s name is no joke.

The 90-minute boat ride to Klein Curaçao was among the roughest I’ve ever endured. Over and over again, we slammed headlong into huge waves, sending the bow of the ship meters into the air, and then crashing back down onto the water. Within minutes, everyone on-board was soaked to the bone, and many weren’t able to tolerate it. If you suffer from seasickness, or even suspect that you might, this might not be the right excursion for you. Seriously. There were a lot of people racing to the railings to empty their stomachs, and not all of them made it in time.

Everyone on the ship was overjoyed when we finally reached our destination. Immediately, Jürgen and I set out to explore, wanting to get away from the ship as swiftly as possible. Klein Curaçao is less than one square mile in size, so walking to the opposite shore required just a few minutes. On the way, we passed by an old lighthouse. Since the island is so small, its lighthouse was placed right in the middle, visible to ships on either side. We climbed up inside the tower, and although the top floor was locked off, were able to enjoy some nice views.

Klein Curacao

We continued east until arriving at the shipwreck of the Maria Bianca Guidesman oil tanker, which is totally rusted and slowly breaking apart under the pressure of the waves. This tanker ran ashore in the 1960s, and about half of its hull is still standing, with the wreckage of the other half strewn across the shore. We saw another, more modern wreck a few meters up the coast. There are apparently a few other boats which underestimated Klein Curaçao, but we didn’t take the time to search these out, as we were eager to return to the beach and get into the water.

The snorkeling is supposed to be great on Klein Curaçao, but maybe we didn’t find the best spot. We didn’t see much living coral or interesting sea life, and I was just about to label it “disappointing,” until we started spotting turtles. Klein Curaçao is mostly undisturbed by humanity and our destructive tendencies, and has long been an important breeding zone for sea turtles.

We never found much coral, but there was a short period during which we saw tons of fish. After our buffet lunch on the ship, the captain and his crew tossed the remaining food into the ocean. What ensued was a massive feeding frenzy underneath the ship. We jumped into the water with masks, and had front row seats for the crazy free-for-all.

Once we had finished swimming, eaten lunch, and cooked our bodies in the sun, it was time to head back to Curaçao. Given the rough outward journey, I was worried, but the return was a totally different experience. This time, we were moving in the direction of the waves. The captain even turned off the motor and foisted the sails, and we cruised back in style, stretched out on the catamaran’s tarp, with glasses of white wine in our hands.

Klein Curaçao is hard to recommend as an excursion for everyone. I’m not exaggerating the hellishness of the morning’s boat ride; it really is hard-core and the crew confirmed that this is always the case. After vomiting, the guy next to us had said, “Why am I on a boat to go to a beach, when I already flew to an island with so many beaches?” And it was hard to disagree with this logic. The beach at Klein Curaçao is great, but Curaçao has a lot of others which are even better. Although we had fun, and I’m glad we did it once, I’m not sure we’d want to repeat this particular adventure.

Location of Klein Curaçao on our Map

This is our underwater camera!

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February 26, 2016 at 8:09 pm Comments (0)

A Hike Around Patrick

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Between the town of Barber and the eastern coast of Curaçao lies a swath of land known as Patrick, named after a plantation house which used to sit roughly in its center. Rugged, isolated and mostly flat, this is a popular area for ATV tours, but you can also hike and easily reach the coast where there are a couple of impressive inlets.

The hike begins on a path through the woods. Two minutes in, we encountered a young guy with a machete, walking swiftly towards us. “Keep cool,” I told myself. “There’s got to be a rational explanation that doesn’t involve bloodshed.” And sure enough, after a cheerful “bon dia,” he took a side path leading to a field of palm trees. A coconut collector, not a murderer. And a reminder that Curaçao is a country where people might have legitimate reasons for walking around with machetes.

Patrick Hike Curaco

The path was easy enough to follow and led us directly to the coast, where we found a strange geological formation called the Suplado. Like a younger sibling to the larger “Eye of Curaçao” at Watamula, this is a round hole not far from the coast, through which the churning ocean is visible. We’ve heard this spot referred to as a “natural jacuzzi,” since you can apparently bathe in the shallow pools which surround it. But this looked as though it would have been dangerous, and we were content to stay dry.

On either side of the Suplado are a pair of interesting bokas, or inlets. To the north is Boka Santu Pretu, most remarkable for its darkened sand and rough waves. We paused here for a packed lunch, and then continued south to Boka Patrick.

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Boka Patrick is a large inlet with a wide, sandy beach strewn with petrified wood and plastic. It’s a shame how much of Curaçao’s eastern coastline is inundated with trash. I don’t know if these are places too infrequently visited to bother with clean-up crews, or if there’s simply too much trash to keep up with, but the heaping mounds of old shoes and tires are a real turn-off. Still, we liked Boka Patrick for its extreme natural beauty and solitude; it’s amazing that such a place could be completely off-the-radar for both tourists and locals.

The path back to our car led us around a hill called the Seru Kosta, and toward heavier vegetation. The final quarter of the hike was the most difficult, as we entered the woods and lost the trail a couple times. But it became interesting when we passed the ruins of the old Patrick plantation house, spotting a well and what looked to be the walls of an old reservoir.

We’d miss the beaches, for sure, but we also enjoyed these peeks into Curaçao’s less-heralded side. This is an island of striking contrasts, which you won’t see unless you embark on hikes like the one we experienced at Patrick.

Locations on our Map: Suplado | Boka Santu Pretu | Boka Patrick
Our Route on Wikiloc

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February 24, 2016 at 10:55 pm Comments (0)

Playa Cas Abou

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A large, full-service beach between Playa Porto Mari and the beaches of San Juan, Playa Cas Abou is not a recommended destination when you feel like getting away from it all. But if you want an easy day on the sand, with food and drinks readily available, you could certainly do worse.

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Cas Abou is yet another of Curaçao’s unfairly beautiful beaches. This long stretch of sand, with palm trees and crystal clear waters draws equal numbers of locals and tourists. You can walk right into the sea without worrying about hurting your feet on dead coral, and the sand is soft and comfortable. All the services you might expect can be found here, including a dive shop and a massage hut located right against the water.

Perhaps the only problem with Cas Abou is that it’s too nice, and attracts too many people. We visited twice, and both times had problems finding shade; there are no umbrellas, so everyone competes for the few areas protected by palm trees. The afternoon hours can get hot, and we even saw people laying right up against the side of the massage hut, trying to get into its shadow.

But if you don’t mind the sun, no problem. This is the kind of beach you’ll be happy to spend all day at. The entrance costs a little, as do the lounge chairs, but it’s not expensive, and you’re free to bring your own drinks and snacks.

Location on our Map

We Used This Camera For the Underwater Photos

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February 24, 2016 at 9:47 pm Comments (0)

Christoffelpark’s Zevenbergen and Seru Bientu

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Without a doubt, Curaçao’s most popular hike is to the top of the Christoffelsberg. Practically speaking, it’s the island’s only popular hike. But as we’ve learned, there are plenty of other trails which merit attention. One of the best is also within the National Christoffelpark: a rarely-used path which leads through a region called the Zevenbergen (Seven Peaks) and to the summit of Seru Bientu, where a unique type of palm tree grows.

At the park office, we signaled our intention to hike the Zevenbergen Trail, but the woman behind the desk strongly advised against it. “It’s poorly marked! You can’t drive to the trailhead! You’ll get lost!” But we have a lot of faith in GPS, and had mapped the trail on our phones beforehand, so we assured her that we’d be fine. “Well, at least make sure to stop by the office afterwards, so that I know you made it. I don’t want to spend the rest of the evening worrying.”

Her concern was genuine, and the warnings weren’t mere exaggerations. The Zevenbergen Trail really is poorly marked, and the road leading to the trailhead really is closed. After leaving your car at a small parking lot, you have to walk nearly three kilometers before even arriving at the trailhead. Under the Curaçaoan sun, the extra distance can turn a moderate hike into a strenuous one.

But as long as you depart early, bring plenty of water, and come equipped with both a GPS-capable smartphone and a solid understanding of the route, there’s not much to worry about. Although it’s largely unmarked, the trail itself is never difficult or overgrown, and if you know where you are, you’ll be fine.

And it’s worth the effort. The Zevenbergen Trail ascends nearly to the same heights as the Christoffelberg, and the scenes are just as stunning. Actually, the vistas from this trail might even be better, because the impressive, jagged peak of the Christoffelberg is always present in the immediate background.

Halfway around the Zevenbergen loop, a side trail leads to the top of the Seru Bientu (Windy Hill). The name is no joke; at the summit of this hill, the gusts of wind are so strong as to be alarming. And this makes the presence of palm trees even more curious. These squat, sturdy Sabal Palms don’t grow anywhere else on Curaçao; just on top of this one mountain. I suppose they enjoy the breeze, but we preferred the views… from here, we could see up and down the coast from Playa Jeremi to Grote Knip.

Zevenbergen Seru Bientu Hike

Overall, including the walk to and from our car, this hike was eleven kilometers long, and took us well over three hours to complete. It was difficult, but nice to be on a trail that’s almost completely ignored by others. We didn’t see another soul the whole time, which was in stark contrast to the heavily-trafficked Christoffelberg Trail.

Here’s hoping that the park eventually puts more of an effort into the Zevenbergen Trail; at the very least, some additional signs would be nice, as would a paved road to the trailhead. But even without these conveniences, this trail offers another option for a great day of hiking in Curaçao’s biggest national park.

Locations on our Map: Parking | Seru Bientu
Our Route on Wikiloc

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February 23, 2016 at 10:27 pm Comments (0)

The Beaches of San Juan

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Four beaches can be accessed from a single entry point near the northern town of Soto. At the former Landhuis of San Juan, you’ll be asked to pay a small entry fee before continuing along a set of dirt paths that lead to the sea. It’s up to you which path you take.

Each of San Juan’s four beaches are beautiful, and you might find yourself tempted to spend time at all of them. Working from north to south, the first you come across is Playa Chiki. The track which leads down to the beach is extremely rough, so we parked at the top of the hill and walked down, certain that our rental car wouldn’t be able to return back up this steep, uneven path of loose gravel.

The beach was gorgeous, and as small as we had reason to suspect (“chiki” is Papiamento for “small”). There were a few people here, including an enterprising couple who’d set up a hammock between two trees. Although we were sorely tempted to get into the water, we returned to the car and continued on our journey… this was going to be a long day, and we didn’t want to lose too much time at the first beach.

Playa Manzaliña was next. This is probably the most well-known of San Juan’s beaches, and for good reason: it’s large, quiet and stunning. Here, we were unable to resist the water’s siren call, and spent a long time swimming, snorkeling and laying out.

While in the water, we were able to see over to the next beach, Playa Shon Mosa, and could have easily swum over. This one is smaller than Manzaliña, but with finer sand and fewer visitors. But after lazing about Manzaliña for a couple hours, the day was getting late, so we decided to skip Shon Mosa and continue to beach number four.

Playa Largu, or “Long Beach,” is the southernmost of San Juan’s beaches, and also the one at which you’re least likely to spend the day. Not that it isn’t nice; it is. But the beach is made up mostly of dead coral, and there is precious little shade to be found. That said, there is at least one good reason to check out Playa Largu: the snorkeling is fantastic, with huge forests of Elkhorn Coral just off the coast, excellent visibility and hundreds of fish to be found.

Locations on our Map: Landhuis San Juan | Playa Chiki | Playa Manzaliña | Playa Shon Mosa | Playa Largu

Our Underwater Camera We Used For This Video

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February 23, 2016 at 8:46 pm Comments (0)

The Ghostly Remains of the Aruba Air Wreck

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Laying along the side of the Koraalspechtweg road, near the Jan Thiel Salt Flats, is the rotting carcass of an abandoned airplane. We had driven by it a number of times, always imagining how much fun it would be to explore the wreckage. And then we realized, there was nothing preventing us from doing exactly that.

Abandoned Aruba Airlines

I’m not sure how the body of this plane ended up along the side of a busy road, although there are some hints to be discovered. It’s fairly clear that this wasn’t a crash site; the plane looks as though it had its wings removed, and that it was placed here on purpose. And painted on the hull is the word “restaurant,” providing a pretty good hint about why the plane was relocated here.

Abandoned Aruba Airlines

Sadly, the proprietor’s visionary entrepreneurial plans never saw the light of day. He seems to have stopped after having stripped the plane almost completely, leaving only some gear in the cockpit. There are no longer any seats, oxygen masks, nor in-flight entertainment consoles.

Exploring this plane requires careful attention to both the ground, where the floors have rotted away, and the ceiling, where there are several small bee hives. After a few minutes, I was eager to get out. Still, it’s a fun little curiosity, as creepy as it is photogenic. And if you like bizarre ruins, you might want to make a short stop and check it out.

Location on our Map

Cheap Flights To Curacao

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February 11, 2016 at 8:03 pm Comment (1)

The Coastal Walk from Otrobanda to Piscadera

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A popular walking path connects the neighborhood of Otrobanda to Piscadera, up the coast to the north. We regularly drive by this path, and always see people walking their dogs or jogging on it. So we decided to join them on an otherwise lazy Saturday afternoon, for a much-needed spot of exercise.

Willemstad Piscadera Walk

We started walking from our house in Otrobanda, but the real “beginning” of this path is just past Holiday Beach. For awhile, every time we saw this hotel-casino complex, Jürgen would say, “There’s Denise,” or “Why is Denise here?” I let it go at first, because it was cute, but eventually I had to correct his pronunciation. “That’s Denny’s.” But he was right — what is Denny’s doing here? It seems strange.

In order to make a nice loop, we walked toward Piscadera on the main boulevard. This wasn’t as pleasant as the coastal path, because of the heavy traffic and the oppressive stench of sewage. Just past Holiday Beach, there’s a small mangrove forest, which seems to be fertilized straight from the toilets of Otrobanda.

We sped past the poop-munching mangroves as swiftly as possible and proceeded on to Piscadera, where the path turned back south and toward the coast. Away from traffic, this is where our walk started to be enjoyable. The long, sandy beach here, Playa Parasasa, appears to be a secret tip hidden in plain sight; it’s in a perfect position for sunset and popular with locals. We made a mental note to return one evening for swimming.

Willemstad Piscadera Walk

As we walked south, we came upon Aqualectra’s decommissioned Mundu Nobo desalination plant, which opened back in 1948, and looks its age. Despite a low average rainfall and almost no fresh groundwater to speak of, Curaçao is renowned for the excellent quality of its tap water. A number of plants around the island distill salt water straight from the ocean, making it safe (and delicious) to drink. Along with Aruba, Curaçao was home to the world’s first commercial desalination plants.

Across from the plant, ranged along the waterfront, are a number of rickety fisherman shacks. This is a lively area, with men and women outside working on their nets and boats, or cleaning fish which has just been brought in from the sea. In a couple weeks, we would be returning to this spot for both scuba diving, and lunch at an incredible seafood joint.

The path ends up at a small park dedicated to the black struggle for freedom, with a large sculpture of hands breaking the chains which had bound them. We were fatigued, and didn’t spend much time in the park. This had been a long, but entertaining walk; I would recommend starting from Holiday Beach, and perhaps just doing the coastal section; you’re not missing much by skipping the boulevard.

Locations on our Map: Holiday Beach | Playa Parasasa | Mundu Nobo Desalination Plant
Our Route on Wikiloc

Travel Health Insurance

Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
Willemstad Piscadera Walk
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February 10, 2016 at 7:02 pm Comments (0)

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Ayo, Dushi Krsou! Coming on the heels of one of the most difficult years we've ever endured, Jrgen and I had been desperate for a relaxing and stress-free 91 days. With its chilled-out atmosphere, low-adrenaline activities, friendly people, comforting cuisine, and an infectiously fun culture and all packed into one, small, easily manageable island, Curaao was exactly what we needed. We couldn't have made a better choice.
For 91 Days