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A Hike Around Patrick

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Between the town of Barber and the eastern coast of Curaçao lies a swath of land known as Patrick, named after a plantation house which used to sit roughly in its center. Rugged, isolated and mostly flat, this is a popular area for ATV tours, but you can also hike and easily reach the coast where there are a couple of impressive inlets.

The hike begins on a path through the woods. Two minutes in, we encountered a young guy with a machete, walking swiftly towards us. “Keep cool,” I told myself. “There’s got to be a rational explanation that doesn’t involve bloodshed.” And sure enough, after a cheerful “bon dia,” he took a side path leading to a field of palm trees. A coconut collector, not a murderer. And a reminder that Curaçao is a country where people might have legitimate reasons for walking around with machetes.

Patrick Hike Curaco

The path was easy enough to follow and led us directly to the coast, where we found a strange geological formation called the Suplado. Like a younger sibling to the larger “Eye of Curaçao” at Watamula, this is a round hole not far from the coast, through which the churning ocean is visible. We’ve heard this spot referred to as a “natural jacuzzi,” since you can apparently bathe in the shallow pools which surround it. But this looked as though it would have been dangerous, and we were content to stay dry.

On either side of the Suplado are a pair of interesting bokas, or inlets. To the north is Boka Santu Pretu, most remarkable for its darkened sand and rough waves. We paused here for a packed lunch, and then continued south to Boka Patrick.

Patrick Hike Curaco

Boka Patrick is a large inlet with a wide, sandy beach strewn with petrified wood and plastic. It’s a shame how much of Curaçao’s eastern coastline is inundated with trash. I don’t know if these are places too infrequently visited to bother with clean-up crews, or if there’s simply too much trash to keep up with, but the heaping mounds of old shoes and tires are a real turn-off. Still, we liked Boka Patrick for its extreme natural beauty and solitude; it’s amazing that such a place could be completely off-the-radar for both tourists and locals.

The path back to our car led us around a hill called the Seru Kosta, and toward heavier vegetation. The final quarter of the hike was the most difficult, as we entered the woods and lost the trail a couple times. But it became interesting when we passed the ruins of the old Patrick plantation house, spotting a well and what looked to be the walls of an old reservoir.

We’d miss the beaches, for sure, but we also enjoyed these peeks into Curaçao’s less-heralded side. This is an island of striking contrasts, which you won’t see unless you embark on hikes like the one we experienced at Patrick.

Locations on our Map: Suplado | Boka Santu Pretu | Boka Patrick
Our Route on Wikiloc

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Patrick Hike Curaco
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February 24, 2016 at 10:55 pm Comments (0)

Christoffelpark’s Zevenbergen and Seru Bientu

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Without a doubt, Curaçao’s most popular hike is to the top of the Christoffelsberg. Practically speaking, it’s the island’s only popular hike. But as we’ve learned, there are plenty of other trails which merit attention. One of the best is also within the National Christoffelpark: a rarely-used path which leads through a region called the Zevenbergen (Seven Peaks) and to the summit of Seru Bientu, where a unique type of palm tree grows.

At the park office, we signaled our intention to hike the Zevenbergen Trail, but the woman behind the desk strongly advised against it. “It’s poorly marked! You can’t drive to the trailhead! You’ll get lost!” But we have a lot of faith in GPS, and had mapped the trail on our phones beforehand, so we assured her that we’d be fine. “Well, at least make sure to stop by the office afterwards, so that I know you made it. I don’t want to spend the rest of the evening worrying.”

Her concern was genuine, and the warnings weren’t mere exaggerations. The Zevenbergen Trail really is poorly marked, and the road leading to the trailhead really is closed. After leaving your car at a small parking lot, you have to walk nearly three kilometers before even arriving at the trailhead. Under the Curaçaoan sun, the extra distance can turn a moderate hike into a strenuous one.

But as long as you depart early, bring plenty of water, and come equipped with both a GPS-capable smartphone and a solid understanding of the route, there’s not much to worry about. Although it’s largely unmarked, the trail itself is never difficult or overgrown, and if you know where you are, you’ll be fine.

And it’s worth the effort. The Zevenbergen Trail ascends nearly to the same heights as the Christoffelberg, and the scenes are just as stunning. Actually, the vistas from this trail might even be better, because the impressive, jagged peak of the Christoffelberg is always present in the immediate background.

Halfway around the Zevenbergen loop, a side trail leads to the top of the Seru Bientu (Windy Hill). The name is no joke; at the summit of this hill, the gusts of wind are so strong as to be alarming. And this makes the presence of palm trees even more curious. These squat, sturdy Sabal Palms don’t grow anywhere else on Curaçao; just on top of this one mountain. I suppose they enjoy the breeze, but we preferred the views… from here, we could see up and down the coast from Playa Jeremi to Grote Knip.

Zevenbergen Seru Bientu Hike

Overall, including the walk to and from our car, this hike was eleven kilometers long, and took us well over three hours to complete. It was difficult, but nice to be on a trail that’s almost completely ignored by others. We didn’t see another soul the whole time, which was in stark contrast to the heavily-trafficked Christoffelberg Trail.

Here’s hoping that the park eventually puts more of an effort into the Zevenbergen Trail; at the very least, some additional signs would be nice, as would a paved road to the trailhead. But even without these conveniences, this trail offers another option for a great day of hiking in Curaçao’s biggest national park.

Locations on our Map: Parking | Seru Bientu
Our Route on Wikiloc

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February 23, 2016 at 10:27 pm Comments (0)

The Hato Caves

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Carved out over the course of millennia into the region’s limestone landscape, the Hato Caves are found next to Curaçao’s international airport. In the past, these caves served as a shelter for the Arwak Indians and a hiding spot for runaway slaves, and are now a popular tourist attraction.

Hato Caves

The entrance to the caves is found on a cliff terrace above the park, so the tour begins with a sharp climb up a flight of stairs. After this initial exertion, though, the rest of the visit is easy; the caves are large and well-lit, and there isn’t any crawling or risky spelunking involved.

We didn’t realize this before buying the tickets, but pictures aren’t allowed in the Hato Caves, except in two designated spots. Our guide explained that the flash might scare the bats. Immediately after giving us this warning, she shined her high-beam flashlight onto the ceiling. “Look, there’s a family of them!” And actually, yeah, the bats did look terrified of the light!

Hato Caves

We promised not to use the flash, but she still said no. “The infrared might cause damage to the rocks, even if it’s imperceptible.” And then, she pointed out a stalagmite which, if you used some imagination, kind of looked like the Virgin Mary. “And to protect the precious Virgin, we demolished the stalactite which was dripping on it.” At this revelation, our group went into stunned silence.

It’s going to be tens of thousands of years before the Virgin stalagmite might be even slightly altered by the natural forces which forged it in the first place. Who knows if Catholicism will even be around then? But remember: no infrared from cameras, because we must protect the integrity of the caves.

Outside of the cave, there’s a cafe-bar, as well as a forgettable “nature walk” into the woods, at the end of which are supposedly some ancient Indian wall paintings. But despite our best efforts, we were unable to say whether the faded marks we spotted were paint or grime.

The tour needs some work, but the Hato Caves are worth visiting. It’s a perfect activity for families, or for those looking for an easy nature experience. The caverns are spacious, but not all that expansive, and the slow-moving tour only takes about a half-hour.

Location on our Map

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February 17, 2016 at 1:45 pm Comments (0)

Koraal Tabak

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The region north of Saint Joris Bay goes by the intriguing name of Koraal Tabak. “Tobacco Coral”? What could that mean? It was a mystery, and so when we learned about a hike in the area, we had to check it out. Spoiler: there was no tobacco.

Koraal Tabak Curacao

The hike starts along the water at the headquarters of the Fundashon Sint Joris Baai. On weekends, local kids can come here to learn how to windsurf for free, but we were visiting on a Tuesday and found the place deserted. We left our car and headed along the coast, immediately encountering the day’s most difficult stretch of hiking.

A steep hill runs right up against the water and, although there is a path to the top, it isn’t well-marked. We kept going off in the wrong direction, scrambling up rocks and through thorny patches, until finally reaching the summit. From here, we enjoyed a great view over Saint Joris and a strange, triangular rock formation called “The Pyramid”. The way back down was even harder, due to the loose, gravelly ground, and at one crucial point I slipped and sat down hard on a patch of thorns.

Luckily, once we got past the hill, the rest of the hike was a breeze. We walked up to the point at which the Saint Joris Bay meets the ocean, and then continued along the coast. This seems to be a favorite place for locals to hang out, and we saw various groups of people walking along the rocks, and watching waves crash against the shore.

Koraal Tabak Curacao

Our path took us to the foot of another hill, and although my butt was still sore and bloody from my earlier fall, there was good reason to ascend. The cave of Koraal Tabak, at the top of the hill, was an exciting surprise — we had known about the existence of a cave here, but hadn’t suspected it to be so cool. This is a large, spacious cavern with multiple chambers, “doors” on either side and a few holes in the ceiling. You can climb up through one of these skylights for an incredible view over the area. If the Arwak Indians didn’t use this cave as a home, I’d be surprised. It was comfortable enough that I’d consider moving in myself.

From here, we had an easy, pleasant hike back to the car. The entire loop was six kilometers, and took us about two hours to complete; if you skip the initial ascent up the pyramid hill, it would be even faster. We’ve been astounded by the variety and beauty of Curaçao’s nature, and this is yet another spot which merits attention. Still confused about the name, though.

Locations: Fundashon Sint Joris Baai | Cave of Koraal Tabak
Our Route on Wikiloc

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Koraal Tabak Curacao
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February 13, 2016 at 8:34 pm Comments (0)

Boka Pos Spanjo and Boka Hulu

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In the rolling, undeveloped hills to the west of St. Martha’s Bay, we completed a long hike through the woods to a few isolated coves, including Boka Pos Spanjo and Boka Hulu. This same trail passes by both the Blue Room and Santu Pretu, but unless you’re prepared for a very long day, you’ll have to pick and choose which beaches you stop at.

Boka Pos Spanjo and Playa Hulu

We were already familiar with the first kilometer of the trail, as it’s the same one we took from Santa Cruz to the black-sand beach of Santu Pretu. But after Santu Pretu, the trail continues inland. This is a wild region of Curaçao, and we didn’t encounter anyone for the entirety of our hike. For the next 90 minutes, we walked up and down deceptively large hills, suffering with the heat and occasionally winning a view over the area.

At the top of the biggest hill, we found the ruins of the old Bos Spanjo Plantation. This place must have been abandoned for more than a hundred years, because almost nothing remains apart from the foundation. We’ve seen more evocative ruins, but it was exciting to explore such an out-of-the-way, forgotten place.

Boka Pos Spanjo and Playa Hulu

From here, it was an easy, downhill walk to Boka Pos Spanjo, whose name I’m guessing means “Spanish Rest.” The beach was full of coral, and the water was too rough to allow swimming, but we sat down to watch a pelican at work, and enjoyed the view across Santa Martha Bay.

The trail now continued on to Boka Hulu. By this point, we’d been hiking for well over two hours, and our energy was starting to flag. Two hours of exercise in Curaçaoan heat is no joke, and it’s important to pack more water than you think you might need. But arriving at Hulu lifted our spirits. After climbing down a set of stone steps to the bay, the scene awaiting us was just gorgeous. We spread out our towels in the shade of a low, rocky overhang, and stretched out.

As they had been at Pos Spanjo, the conditions at Hulu were too rough for swimming, but I was unable to resist after the sweaty hike. And I was immediately sorry; the jagged rocks were too shallow, the waves far too powerful, and I was lucky to emerge from the water unscathed. I think that when the waters are calmer, you could swim at Hulu, but I’m not sure about that.

Boka Pos Spanjo and Playa Hulu

The rest of our hike brought us back north, past the jump-off point for the Blue Room and returning us to Santu Pretu. At a slow pace with plenty of breaks, this ten-kilometer loop took us about three hours. There are ways to make it shorter, though. For instance, you could stick to the coast and entirely skip the more grueling interior part of the loop; it’s pretty, but possibly not worth the effort.

Whatever you decide to do in this wild region west of the Santa Martha Bay, you’re almost certain to be doing it alone. We love excursions like this; I don’t know if it means we’re antisocial, but there’s nothing better than a day of hiking without seeing another soul.

Locations on our Map: Boka Pos Spanjo | Boka Hulu
Our Route on Wikiloc

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Boka Pos Spanjo and Playa Hulu
Boka Pos Spanjo and Playa Hulu
Boka Pos Spanjo and Playa Hulu
Boka Pos Spanjo and Playa Hulu
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February 12, 2016 at 5:16 pm Comments (0)

The Coastal Walk from Otrobanda to Piscadera

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A popular walking path connects the neighborhood of Otrobanda to Piscadera, up the coast to the north. We regularly drive by this path, and always see people walking their dogs or jogging on it. So we decided to join them on an otherwise lazy Saturday afternoon, for a much-needed spot of exercise.

Willemstad Piscadera Walk

We started walking from our house in Otrobanda, but the real “beginning” of this path is just past Holiday Beach. For awhile, every time we saw this hotel-casino complex, Jürgen would say, “There’s Denise,” or “Why is Denise here?” I let it go at first, because it was cute, but eventually I had to correct his pronunciation. “That’s Denny’s.” But he was right — what is Denny’s doing here? It seems strange.

In order to make a nice loop, we walked toward Piscadera on the main boulevard. This wasn’t as pleasant as the coastal path, because of the heavy traffic and the oppressive stench of sewage. Just past Holiday Beach, there’s a small mangrove forest, which seems to be fertilized straight from the toilets of Otrobanda.

We sped past the poop-munching mangroves as swiftly as possible and proceeded on to Piscadera, where the path turned back south and toward the coast. Away from traffic, this is where our walk started to be enjoyable. The long, sandy beach here, Playa Parasasa, appears to be a secret tip hidden in plain sight; it’s in a perfect position for sunset and popular with locals. We made a mental note to return one evening for swimming.

Willemstad Piscadera Walk

As we walked south, we came upon Aqualectra’s decommissioned Mundu Nobo desalination plant, which opened back in 1948, and looks its age. Despite a low average rainfall and almost no fresh groundwater to speak of, Curaçao is renowned for the excellent quality of its tap water. A number of plants around the island distill salt water straight from the ocean, making it safe (and delicious) to drink. Along with Aruba, Curaçao was home to the world’s first commercial desalination plants.

Across from the plant, ranged along the waterfront, are a number of rickety fisherman shacks. This is a lively area, with men and women outside working on their nets and boats, or cleaning fish which has just been brought in from the sea. In a couple weeks, we would be returning to this spot for both scuba diving, and lunch at an incredible seafood joint.

The path ends up at a small park dedicated to the black struggle for freedom, with a large sculpture of hands breaking the chains which had bound them. We were fatigued, and didn’t spend much time in the park. This had been a long, but entertaining walk; I would recommend starting from Holiday Beach, and perhaps just doing the coastal section; you’re not missing much by skipping the boulevard.

Locations on our Map: Holiday Beach | Playa Parasasa | Mundu Nobo Desalination Plant
Our Route on Wikiloc

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Willemstad Piscadera Walk
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February 10, 2016 at 7:02 pm Comments (0)

In the Air with Blue Skies Helicopters

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We’ve been up in a Cessna, floated in a hot-air balloon, and even tried out paragliding, but neither Jürgen nor I had ever been in a helicopter. With colorful towns and diverse nature packed into a small area and framed by clear Caribbean waters, Curaçao is a perfect candidate for a helicopter tour. So we were thrilled when Blue Skies invited us on a trip around the island’s eastern coast.

Helicopter Tour Curacao
The view over Punda

Based in Otrobanda on the Saint Anna Bay, Blue Skies is the island’s only helicopter tourism company, and their chopper is a familiar sight in the skies of Curaçao, easy to recognize with its bright blue body. They’ve been in operation since 2007, and offer a number of different tours in a Bel 206 Jetranger (which, according to their website, is the safest chopper in the world).

Looking over the map in their office, they showed us the route we’d be taking, over Spanish Waters and the Eastpoint, before returning over Punda. Sounded good to us, but it was hard to concentrate since my mind was on a hyperactive loop. “Chopper chopper chopper,” as though I was five-years-old again. I just couldn’t wait to get inside the thing and get going!

Helicopter Tour Curacao
The Seaquarium

Lifting off was strange at first; this is a totally different experience to flying in an airplane, but we adjusted quickly. The tour was perfect. The entire southeastern section of Curaçao, a huge swath of land known as Oostpunt, is private property. The owner has steadfastly resisted selling it off, prohibiting access to practically everyone. The result is a pristine, untouched natural environment, and one of the few ways to see it is from the air. We flew high above the region, and then came down low to inspect some of the highlights. Once, hovering just a few meters above a large lagoon, we saw a turtle swimming along, unconcerned about the giant machine whirring above its head.

Jürgen was in a state of photography panic. As we coasted over Punda and Otrobanda, it looked as though he had eight arms and four cameras, so fast was he turning from side to side to snap pictures. There’s nothing like taking pictures from the air, and the helicopter permits a freedom of movement not possible in an airplane; our pilot was able to hover, circle a specific target, and lower or raise, depending on what we were trying to shoot.

Helicopter Tour Curacao
The eastern coast of Eastpoint

The tour was everything we could have possibly hoped for, and we had fun with the team behind Blue Skies, who were very friendly. It’s a safe assumption that they enjoy their job, and it shows. If you’re interested, take a look at the various tours and specials on offer, and get in touch. And if you have a special wish, they’re open to custom flights as well.

Blue Skies Helicopters – Website

Cheap Flights To Curacao

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Avila Beach Hotel
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Mambo Beach
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Jan Thiel
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Fort Beekenburg with the Kabrietenburg behind it
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Spanish Waters
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Santa Barbera Golf Resort & Tafelberg
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Salt Flats at Eastpoint
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The Eastpoint Lagoon
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St. Joris Bay
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Helicopter Tour CuracaoQueen Juliana Bridge
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Otrobanda
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Rif Fort in foreground
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February 9, 2016 at 1:26 pm Comments (2)

The Cliffs and Caves of Hato Plains

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The deserted section of coastline to the northwest of Curaçao’s international airport is known as the Hato Plains. There are no paved roads here, but if you have a jeep, this wide expanse of dry red earth trapped between the ocean and a set of inland cliffs is a fascinating area to explore.

Jeep Tour Hato Plains

We rented a jeep for a single day, with the sole purpose of visiting Hato Plains. As luck would have it, the weather turned out to be miserable and rainy, but we were compelled to stick with the plan. Rental jeeps aren’t cheap, and it’s not like we could change the reservation at the last minute. Oh well, when hiking in temperatures as hot as Curaçao’s, rain can be a blessing.

A small access road leads from the airport onto the plains. This initial section is popular with plane-spotters, because airplanes take off and land right overhead. We saw a few people waiting with binoculars, possibly hoping to see the jumbo KLM jet which arrives daily from Amsterdam.

We parked our jeep at a few different spots along the way, the first being Cueba Shingot, a cave near the coast. The entrance is just a hole on the ground, barely visible on the flat earth of the plains, but the cavern is larger than it first appears, and you can walk quite far into the dark; care is required, though, because this close to the ocean, the rocks are slick.

Next, we returned further inland and parked our car near the cliffs, to look for a trail that was supposed to lead us to a series of caves. But this trail was almost impossible to find. Hato Plains is not developed as a tourism sight, meaning that there are very few signs for independent hikers. It took a lot of hunting along the cliffs before we finally saw a marker pointing to the Cueba di Pachi. One problem: the sign was pointed directly up.

Jeep Tour Hato Plains

Mountain climbing is not our strong suit, but the terrace was only a few meters above the ground, and so we clambered up the rocks. The Cueba di Pachi was smaller and spookier than Shingot had been, and we explored it for only a couple seconds, chased off by the bats swooping past our heads. But we stayed on top of the cliffs, and followed a trail which led us an even smaller and spookier cave called Cueba Mirador, whose entrance was entirely overgrown.

Having returned along the path back down to the plains, we walked for a long time along the foot of the cliffs. This was the highlight of the day; every few minutes, we would discuss whether we should turn around, but the nature was so strange and beautiful, that we didn’t want to miss anything, and we pressed on much farther than we probably should have, considering the bad weather.

Jeep Tour Hato Plains

We drove through the remainder of the Hato Plains, slowly approaching a set of towering windmills on the horizon. Near the end of the park, we found something called the “Sabana di Arte,” where a local artist has incorporated the terrain into a series of weird art pieces: a section of jagged rock elaborated to resemble a dragon, for example, or wall paintings of local fauna.

We exited the park at the private farm of San Pedro, where there was a locked gate. Accessing the Hato Plains from the airport is free, but on the northern end, you have to pay the landowners a few guilders to get out. It’s worth it, to avoid the long drive back. Although we returned home wet and exhausted, it had been a fun day and we were in good spirits.

Locations on our Map: Cueba Shingot | Cueba di Pashi | Sabana di Arte

One Day Jeep Rental In Curacao

Jeep Tour Hato Plains
Jeep Tour Hato Plains
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Jeep Tour Hato Plains
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February 8, 2016 at 10:51 pm Comments (0)

The Curaçao Aloe Vera Plantation

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Curaçao has a long history of cultivating aloe vera, since it’s one of the few plants able to thrive in the island’s dry and windy climate. We visited the Curaloe Plantation and Factory, near the Ostrich Farm and St. Joris Bay, to see how the plants are grown, harvested and processed. Or at least, that’s what we were hoping to see.

Aloe Vera Farm Curacao

The Curaloe Plantation is free to visit, and that’s absolutely appropriate, considering that it offers almost nothing to the visitor. After parking and looking at the wide fields of aloe vera, we went inside the reception building. The woman working informed us that they don’t do tours of the factory, nor are there tours of the fields. “So what can we do?”

We could stand on the wooden platform next to the parking lot and look at the fields. We could read a few information signs about the history of aloe. We could buy expensive products in the shop. We could watch short videos about the production of aloe vera on a TV in the shop. And that was it.

Aloe Vera Farm Curacao

It was impossible to hide our disappointment, so she hastened to inform us that watching the videos was “just as good” as touring the plantation. We scoffed, but she doubled down, becoming almost irritated. “Yes, it is. The videos have all the same information. There’s no reason for anyone to see inside the factory, or visit the fields.” At this point, we gave up. Good to know that short YouTube videos are a superior substitute for actual experiences! Now I don’t ever have to actually make it to Machu Pichu; I can just watch some online drone footage.

Of course, factories are under no obligation to open their doors to tourists. But then, they shouldn’t promote themselves as a tourist experience. All Curaloe really wants is to get you inside their store.

This was, hands down, the lamest experience we had on Curaçao, and especially disappointing since we generally love visiting factories like this. If you’re dying to see a field full of the plants, by all means, make a quick stop. It’s free. But don’t go hoping for an interesting look into the production of aloe vera.

Location on our Map

A List Of Curacao Hotels

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February 6, 2016 at 4:29 pm Comments (0)

Intrepid Explorers Discover Playa Hunku

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We carefully made our way along an overgrown path, which, according to my calculations, had last been used by the Arwak Indians sometime in the late 1400s. Our mission was to find the legendary Playa Hunku, a place rumored about in whispered conversations across the island, but which no living man or woman had yet laid eyes upon. Our expedition was fraught with danger (cacti! mosquitoes!) but after a wearying trek of twenty entire minutes, we saw it: the fabled beach of Playa Hunku. And it was ours… all ours!!

Playa Hunky Curacao

The best part about this story is, I’m only exaggerating a little bit. Playa Hunku really is a hidden gem on Curaçao. Despite being so close to the popular resort of Playa Porto Mari, relatively few people know about it. We’ve even met locals who weren’t aware of its existence.

I hasten to point out that Playa Hunku is on private land. The road which leads there is closed, with signs indicating that trespassing is forbidden, and this might explain why the beach is almost always empty. But we checked with a few quasi-legitimate sources, all of whom assured us that it wouldn’t be a problem to walk over to the beach via the short path from Porto Mari. The owners don’t really care if the occasional tourist finds their way here, but they don’t want to open the road and have it become popular on a larger scale.

The path to Playa Hunku begins at the back of Porto Mari’s parking lot, with a brisk ascent up the Seru Mateo. From the top of this hill, you can look back for a nice view over the Playa Porto Mari… and it looks so beautiful, you’ll be tempted to run back down the hill and jump into the water. But press on, audacious adventurer! After a short hike of about twenty minutes, you’ll reach the other side of the hill, and be rewarded with your first glimpse of Playa Hunku. Note that the descent to the beach is steep and requires some caution.

The beach is a dream; a beautiful patch of sand, larger than we expected, with excellent snorkeling. While I was out by myself, a massive fish swam next to me, easily six feet long. I only spotted it from the corner of my eye, and wasn’t able to identify it before it swam swiftly away. In moments like this, logic flies out the window… I know there are no shark attacks on Curaçao. I know that. But I also know there’s always a first time. So I went into panic mode, swimming as swiftly as possible to shore. Later, Jürgen dared to go in after me, and got a better look at the same fish… it was a tuna.

We had an incredible time at Playa Hunku, and are loathe to write about it, since the magic of the place lies in its mystery and seclusion. But you’re reading this, which means you’re cool, so we’re letting you in on the tip. If you do go, please keep in mind that you’re a guest on private land. Don’t show up with a huge party, and (although it hardly needs said) make sure to clean up after yourself.

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Location on our Map
Our Route on Wikiloc

Playa Hunky Curacao
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February 5, 2016 at 11:04 pm Comments (2)

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A Hike Around Patrick Between the town of Barber and the eastern coast of Curaçao lies a swath of land known as Patrick, named after a plantation house which used to sit roughly in its center. Rugged, isolated and mostly flat, this is a popular area for ATV tours, but you can also hike and easily reach the coast where there are a couple of impressive inlets.
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